Thursday, November 15, 2012

Save on Clothes

"Insider Tips for Your Favorite Stores"

Must-Do-Steps

1. SIGN UP FOR SALES ALERTS:  Most retailers have regular email alerts that let you know about sales (in-store and online), discount codes, contest, and more.

2. GRAB COUPONS: Never check out (virtually or in person) without searching for a coupon or promo code to get a discount or free shipping.  

3. SCOUR ONLINE CLEARANCE RACKS:  Many retailers offer deeply discounted items in sale sections on their websites, which can be a lot easier to go through than store racks. And you may find stuff online that you won't see in the stores.

4. TRY EBAY:  If you're seeking a specific item (used or new) say a little black dress from your favorite designer in a size 12 you might find it on eBay.com for steal.

5. BE LOYAL:  If stores you shop have a free loyalty card, sign up to save. A good one: The Shop Your Way Rewards card nets you savings Sears Company.

6. BE A FOLLOWER:  Connect with your favorite retailers and brands on Social Media and you can get the first scoop on the latest sales, plus tips off to upcoming special promotions.

I hope this helps you find great savings on your clothes this season.




Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Coco Chanel



When people around the world think of France, they think of fashion. Coco Chanel was born there, and that’s where she started her career.

Coco Chanel’s real name was Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel. She claimed a birthday of 1893, with a birthplace of Auvergne. But, she was actually born on August 19, 1883 in Saumur. Her mother worked in a poorhouse, which was an institution where poor people were maintained with public funds, where Coco was born. Then, at the age of six her mother died leaving her and her five siblings in her father’s care. Coco survived her impoverished childhood and strict convent education. These difficulties of her early life inspired her to pursue an extraordinarily different lifestyle. First, she tried singing, which is how she got the nickname “Coco”, and then she tried out being a milliner (a person who makes or sells women’s hats.)

She opened her first shop in Paris of 1913 with the help of two men she met while singing. It is here where she sold hats and garments. Her simple hats became very popular and were sold to women of society. Soon, she expanded to couture making jewelry and clothing, also working with jersey fabric to make the Chanel Suit along with the Chanel Jacket. For the first time in women’s fashion, because of the jersey suit, women showed their bare ankles in the street. The suit was not just a trendy fashion, but it was a fashion that fit a woman’s lifestyle. “I make fashion women can live in, feel comfortable in and look younger in,” Chanel had said. Also, her unique sense of style led her to create a famous perfume, Chanel No.5, which was the first designer brand perfume.

But then in 1939, she had to close the doors of her salon during the war with Germany. But during the war, the designer Christian Dior became successful and that made Chanel determined to fight back. Chanel’s amazing comeback collection of couture debuted in 1953. She updated many of her older designs, making more modern ones that caught the eye of wealthy women and celebrities.

Coco Chanel really revolutionized women’s fashion in the 20th century, by completely redesigning the way women dressed. Back then, women dressed very conservatively, and were thought to be less than men. It was Chanel who took her ideas of fashion, and showed the world these fascinating designs, and told people that sometimes when you take a piece of men’s clothing and feminize it, it will have an amazing result. She exhibited her clothing to the women in France first, and then expanded to show the whole world, with her designs becoming very popular. Chanel changed the way women look at clothes, and because of her hard work and what she did to the women’s fashion world, it has effected us greatly today.


Monday, November 12, 2012

The Organizer: The Organizer: Fashion History Series (pt. 2)

The Organizer: The Organizer: Fashion History Series (pt. 2): The Organizer: Fashion History Series (pt. 2) : Flapper styles of short skirts, low waistlines, and bobbed hair characterized fashion in the...

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012

The Organizer: Fashion History Series (pt. 2)

The Organizer: Fashion History Series (pt. 2): Flapper styles of short skirts, low waistlines, and bobbed hair characterized fashion in the late 1920s During the 1920s, clothing st...

Fashion History Series (pt. 2)


Flapper styles of short skirts, low waistlines, and bobbed hair characterized fashion in the late 1920s

During the 1920s, clothing styles officially entered the modern era of fashion design. During this decade, women began to liberate themselves from constricting clothes for the first time and openly embrace more comfortable styles like pants and short skirts. While popular fashions remained relatively conservative prior to 1925, short skirts, low waistlines, and revolutionary styles of the flapper era characterized the latter half of the decade. Dresses were made to fit close to the body in order to emphasize youthful elegance. Hems were cut to the knee, and waistlines disappeared almost entirely. Cloche hats without rims also became a key popular clothing item during this period.

The fashion styles of the flapper era lasted throughout the 1920s and into the early 1930s before the hardships of the Great Depression forced more conservative trends. During this time, skirts became longer and the natural waistline became a more important part of dresses as society began to move back toward a more traditionally feminine look. While some trends of the 1920s, such as cloche hats and bobbed hair, lasted slightly longer, the difficult times of the 1930s definitely called for more conservative wear.

The decade of the 1930s also saw the first true distinction between day and evening styles. During the affluent era of the 1920s, women could easily wear impractical clothing during the day without worry, so long as domestic servants took care of the chores. However, the hard times of the Depression caused many women to do more work at home themselves and necessitated more practical clothing for the daytime. Simple skirts and pared-down outfits allowed for ease of mobility in the daytime, while new fabrics such as metallic lamé became popular for more luxurious evening wear. The newly improved, synthetic fabric rayon became an important part of many designers’ fashions during the 1930s, and cotton also moved into more stylish clothing designs; however, silk remained the primary fabric of most fashion designers.

Monday, November 5, 2012

Fashion History Series


Modern Era: 1920-1940

During the 1920s, clothing styles officially entered the modern era of fashion design. During this decade, women began to liberate themselves from constricting clothes for the first time and openly embrace more comfortable styles like pants and short skirts. While popular fashions remained relatively conservative prior to 1925, short skirts, low waistlines, and revolutionary styles of the flapper era characterized the latter half of the decade (Hall 1992). Dresses were made to fit close to the body in order to emphasize youthful elegance. Hems were cut to the knee, and waistlines disappeared almost entirely. Cloche hats without rims also became a key popular clothing item during this period (Pendergast 2004). 
The fashion styles of the flapper era lasted throughout the 1920s and into the early 1930s before the hardships of the Great Depression forced more conservative trends. During this time, skirts became longer and the natural waistline became a more important part of dresses as society began to move back toward a more traditionally feminine look (Hall 1992). While some trends of the 1920s, such as cloche hats and bobbed hair, lasted slightly longer, the difficult times of the 1930s definitely called for more conservative wear.
The decade of the 1930s also saw the first true distinction between day and evening styles. During the affluent era of the 1920s, women could easily wear impractical clothing during the day without worry, so long as domestic servants took care of the chores . However, the hard times of the Depression caused many women to do more work at home themselves and necessitated more practical clothing for the daytime. Simple skirts and pared-down outfits allowed for ease of mobility in the daytime, while new fabrics such as metallic lamé became popular for more luxurious evening wear. The newly improved, synthetic fabric rayon became an important part of many designers’ fashions during the 1930s, and cotton also moved into more stylish clothing designs; however, silk remained the primary fabric of most fashion designers.
Resource: Random History

Saturday, November 3, 2012

The Organizer: The History of FASHION

The Organizer: The History of FASHION: Haute Couture Era: 1900-1920 Women’s fashion in the early 1900s highlighted the silhouette of the mature, full-figured body. Low bust...

The History of FASHION


Haute Couture Era: 1900-1920

Women’s fashion in the early 1900s highlighted the silhouette of the mature, full-figured body. Low busts and curvy hips were flaunted by the dress styles of the era.  In the early years of the first decade, skirts were long and full and often contained a small train, similar to what is commonly seen in today’s wedding gowns. However, as the decade drew to a close, skirts gradually grew shorter and began to reveal tantalizing glimpses of the ankle. The overall silhouette of dresses also changed slightly, moving toward a narrower, straighter line.

The early 1900s also marked the flowering of the haute couture movement in Paris. Parisian designers set the fashion tone for the rest of the Western world, and their designs were highly sought after by women of the upper classes. Quite frequently, horse races served as a debut for important new fashions, as well-known designers sent models to attend these races wearing their latest creations.

From 1910 until the start of the First World War in 1914, fashion continued to move toward slimmer, narrower silhouettes that emphasized flat busts and slim hips. Bustles and trains were removed from dresses, as fashion designers played with the length of skirts to reveal enticing new areas of skin. However, as the war began in 1914, attention and materials were drawn away from fashion design, and no significant fashion developments occurred again until peace was declared at the end of 1918. 

Resource For this Article:  Random History